‘Shaun of the Dead’ (2004)

Shaun-of-Dead

Dave’s 3-Word Review:
It’s deadly hilarious.

Well, Halloween is over, and I recorded a movie purposefully to see it on Halloween, but I got caught up in other, non-Halloween movies that I had previously promised myself I would review. So I did, and now I’m reviewing “Shaun of the Dead“. Now many of you have already seen this, but I have not. The only other comedy on zombies I have seen is “Zombieland“, so I was interested to see how this was done.

 Salesman Shaun (Simon Pegg) begins to notice oddities from different people around town, and that things weren’t exactly normal. It isn’t long before he and his best friend Ed (Nick Frost) notice how many zombies there really are. So he plans to save his family and friends and go to the Winchester, a local pub, to wait until everything blows over. Things, however, become more complicated when members of their team start getting picked off one by one.

 This film is one of the few movies that have successfully made fun of stereotypes without taking it too far, making it a perfect parody. The beginning of the movie makes fun of jumping moments of horror films, and the random shots of  unnoticed zombies in the background is very hilarious.

 The viewer never knows why the zombies start showing up, they just know that they do. That may be seen as a recognition of other unexplained zombie movies, which just adds on to the parody success. In any case, it works, and it is done well. The comedy is pretty well done as well, taking light of a overly-done serious topic is always a blast. I loved “Zombieland” for the same reason, but I may actually like this film more.

 Simon Pegg has a way about him for producing laughter from an audience. He often teams up with Nick Frost in his films because they work so well together. Their friendship chemistry looks and feels believable. The only problem I would like to put out there is the acting when it came to serious. There was two types in this film, fake, overdramatic drama, and real drama. There was clearly separate times in the movie when there was supposed to be real emotion, and other times when it was clear that they were supposed to make fun of it. The problem was that it felt nearly indistinguishable. It’s not a huge issue, because it is a parody, but the problem arises when they don’t portray the message they set out for.

 Some movies I think are great comedies without really physically laughing. It comes from understanding the jokes, thinking they are funny, but really only sporting a straight face. However, I was cracking up with this movie, which is saying something. I really is an entertaining watch. I am glad I watched it , and I would suggest you all to do it too, it shouldn’t be missed.

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