Big Hero 6 (2014)

Big-Hero-6

Dave’s 3-Word Review:
Another charming story.

I’m really turning into quite the fan of these Disney Animation Studios movie. They are basically saying, “Thanks, Pixar – but we got this!” – and they do. Far beyond the quality of the effects and animation, you dig down into these films and find a lot of heart and originality through and through. That alone is hard to come by, and it makes all the better for the overall viewing experience. I’m sure I would have added this to my end of the year awards of 2014, but I hadn’t seen it until now. That being said, Big Hero 6 isn’t an animated film you should plan on missing.

Big Hero 6 stars Ryan Potter as Hiro, a teenage genius in a world full of illegal robot fighting and other futuristic things. It’s the fictitious mashup city of San Fransokyo – and Hiro’s elder brother introduced him into furthering his intellect with science discovery – but when an evil man wearing a kabuki mask steals Hiro’s newest invention – it’s up to him and a group of five other super-geniuses to become heroes of their own to take that mad man down. Among them is Baymax, a cute, fluffy, and marshmallow-like health bot that Hiro transforms into the ultimate weapon.

This is honestly a pretty endearing and powerful animated film. Its originality shines through from the beginning and as the film powers through each scene, it’s hard not to acknowledge the emotional aspects of the film as far as family and friends go – and how all of that is so important. Another message hiding behind everything is the positive attributes to modern technology – and how you can make or break the world depending on how you use it. One thing is for sure – Big Hero 6 will definitely get some kids interested in science.

What I’d rather talk about is the story of the thing, and how unique it is. For one thing, it’s pretty typical as far as good vs. evil goes – but the way they go about it is very memorable. Notice how Baymax is hilarious as the comedic-relief/cute character. Also notice how there’s not a hundred of them and the movie doesn’t just focus on that (I’m talking to you Minions and Penguins of Madagascar). So far, they know their limit and what’s actually funny and memorable…and not caving into what they THINK kids want. Kids like colors and physical humor and stupid stuff, yes – but what they will cherish for a long time is diversity in messages, characters, and yes – even originality. This is something they can keep on their movie shelf.

Think about how unnecessary the blending of the two cities was – but the inclusion isn’t hated. Instead – it is what it is – unique and fits exclusively in the world of this particular movie…and that’s something no one can take away from it. Think about the look and the roles of each particular character. They all have their own colors, but the styles all fit in. They all had different, but very unique weaponry systems – and the nemesis was really evil with an overall feeling of impending doom the entire time – he was quite simply perfect for the film. Through all these great messages, unique aspects, and even dark scenarios – the whole movie was light enough for young kids to adore – and that makes for one heck of a good kids movie.

The Good:

As far as kids movies go – this is really good. What’s more, Big Hero 6 is ultimately unique in its storytelling and it never caves into what movies tend to think kids want to see nowadays. Instead, they stick to their guns and made something that is easily memorable for years to come.

The Bad:

It’s still a kids movie, and because of that, it does have a limited target audience. I personally understood and respected the meaningful messages the film had to explore, but some of the comedic elements were clearly meant more for children than for grown adults…and I’ve seen these kids movies appeal to everyone better than this technically did. Still though – it was pretty good.

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